Medical Cannabis States


Medical Cannabis States

Since 1996, individual States across our Nation have "experimented" with passing progressive laws to allow access to Medical Cannabis in some form.

Today, 30 States throughout the United States have Legalized Medical Cannabis laws, and Mora Mota Group has compiled a list of those States with details on their programs below: 

 
 

Alaska

In 1998, voters approved Ballot Measure 8 by 58% to remove state-level criminal penalties on the use, possession and cultivation of Medical Marijuana by patients who possess written documentation from their physician advising that they "might benefit from the medical use of marijuana." 

 

Arizona

In 2010, voters approved Proposition 203 by 50.13% to allow registered qualifying patients (who must have a physician's written certification that they have been diagnosed with a debilitating condition and that they would likely receive benefit from marijuana) to obtain marijuana from a registered nonprofit dispensary, and to possess and use medical marijuana to treat the condition.

 

Arkansas

In 2016, voters approved Ballot Measure Issue 6 by 53.2% to enact a Constitutional amendment making medical marijuana legal in Arkansas and establishing a system for cultivation, acquisition, and distribution of marijuana.

 

California

In 1996, voters approved Proposition 215 by 56% to remove state-level criminal penalties on the use, possession and cultivation of marijuana by patients who possess a "written or oral recommendation" from their physician that he or she "would benefit from medical marijuana." 

 

Colorado

In 2000, voters approved Ballot Amendment 20 by 54% to remove state-level criminal penalties on the use, possession and cultivation of marijuana by patients who possess written documentation from their physician affirming that he or she suffers from a debilitating condition and advising that they "might benefit from the medical use of marijuana." 

 

Connecticut

In 2012, Governor Daniel Malloy signed into law House Bill 5389 in order for "a qualifying patient shall register with the Department of Consumer Protection... prior to engaging in the palliative use of marijuana. A qualifying patient who has a valid registration certificate... shall not be subject to arrest or prosecution, penalized in any manner,... or denied any right or privilege."

 

Delaware

In 2011, Governor Jack Markell signed into law Senate Bill 17 in order to protect a patient from arrest if his or her physician certifies, in writing, that the patient has a specified debilitating medical condition and that the patient would receive therapeutic benefit from medical marijuana.

 

District of Columbia

In 2010, the Legalization of Marijuana for Medical Treatment Amendment Act of 2010 was signed by the Mayor to allow for qualifying patients in the District the right to obtain and use marijuana for medical purposes when his or her primary healthcare practitioner has provided a written recommendation.

 

Florida

In 2014, voters approved Amendment 2 by 71.3% to allow for the medical use of marijuana for individuals with debilitating medical conditions as determined by a licensed Florida physician, allows caregivers to assist patients' medical use of marijuana and the Department of Health shall register and regulate centers that produce and distribute marijuana for medical purposes.

 

Hawaii

In 2000, Governor Ben Cayetano signed into law Senate Bill 862 in order to remove state-level criminal penalties on the use, possession and cultivation of marijuana by patients who possess a signed statement from their physician affirming that he or she suffers from a debilitating condition and that the "potential benefits of medical use of marijuana would likely outweigh the health risks." 

 

Illinois

In 2013, Governor Pat Quinn signed into law House Bill 1 to create The Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act that establishes a patient registry program, protects registered qualifying patients and registered designated caregivers from "arrest, prosecution, or denial of any right or privilege," and allows for the registration of cultivation centers and dispensing organizations. 

 

Maine

In 1999, voters approved Ballot Question 2 by 61% in order to remove state-level criminal penalties on the use, possession and cultivation of marijuana by patients who possess an oral or written "professional opinion" from their physician that he or she "might benefit from the medical use of marijuana."

 

Maryland

In 2014, Governor Martin O'Malley signed into law House Bill 881 to establish the Natalie M. LaPrade Medical Marijuana Commission, along with the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, to develop regulations for patient registry and identification cards, dispensary licensing, setting fees and possession limits, and more. 

 

Massachusetts

In 2012, voters approved Ballot Question 3 by 63% to remove punishment under state law for qualifying patients, physicians and health care professionals, personal caregivers for patients, or medical marijuana treatment center agents for the medical use of marijuana

 

Michigan

In 2008, voters approved Proposal 1 by 63% to approve medical cannabis for treatment for debilitating medical conditions and remove criminal penalties for patients who may possess up to two and one-half (2.5) ounces of usable marijuana and twelve marijuana plants kept in an enclosed, locked facility. 

 

Minnesota

In 2014, Governor Mark Dayton signed into law SF 2470 to develop the Minnesota Medical Cannabis Program, allowing seriously ill Minnesotans to use medical cannabis to treat certain qualified medical conditions.

 

Montana

In 2004, voters approved Initiative 148 by 62% to remove punishment under state law for qualifying patients, physicians and health care professionals, personal caregivers for patients, and establish a registration program to allow qualified patients and caregivers access to medical cannabis for qualified medical conditions.

 

Nevada

In 2000, voters approved Ballot Question 9 to remove state-level criminal penalties on the use, possession and cultivation of marijuana by patients who have "written documentation" from their physician that marijuana may alleviate his or her condition. 

 

New Hampshire

In 2013, Governor Maggie Hassan signed into law House Bill 573 that authorizes the use of therapeutic cannabis in New Hampshire, establishes a registry identification card system, allows for the registration of up to four non-profit alternative treatment centers in the state, and establishes an affirmative defense for qualified patients and designated caregivers with valid registry ID cards.

 

New Jersey

In 2010, Governor Jon signed into law Senate Bill 119 that protects patients who use marijuana to alleviate suffering from debilitating medical conditions, as well as their physicians, primary caregivers, and those who are authorized to produce marijuana for medical purposes from arrest, prosecution, property forfeiture, and criminal and other penalties.

 

New Mexico

In 2007, The Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act (Senate Bill 523) was passed to remove state-level criminal penalties on the use and possession of marijuana by patients, in a regulated system for alleviating symptoms caused by debilitating medical conditions and their medical treatments.

 

New York

In 2014, Governor Andrew Cuomo signed into law Assembly Bill 6357 in order to establish regulations and register dispensing organizations to dispense medical cannabis to patients who may receive medical marijuana products from any dispensing facility of any Registered Organization in New York State.

 

North Dakota

In 2016, voters approved The North Dakota Compassionate Care Act (Ballot Measure 5) to add a new chapter to Title 19 of the North Dakota Century Code creating an Act providing for the medical use of marijuana through the Department of Health.

 

Ohio

In 2016, Governor John Kasich signed into law House Bill 523 in order to authorize the use of marijuana for medical purposes and establishes the Medical Marijuana Control Program. 

 

Oregon

In 1998, voters approved Ballot Measure 67 to remove state-level criminal penalties on the use, possession and cultivation of marijuana by patients who possess a signed recommendation from their physician stating that marijuana "may mitigate" his or her debilitating symptoms. 

 

Pennsylvania

In 2016, Governor Tom Wolf signed into law Senate Bill 3 to certify cannabis for medical use by a Pennsylvania resident with a serious medical condition and is limited by statute in Pennsylvania.

 

Rhode Island

In 2006, the Rhode Island Legislature passed the Edward O. Hawkins and Thomas C. Slater Medical Marijuana Act, after Governor Donald Carcieri vetoed Senate Bill 0710, permits Rhode Island residents with debilitating medical conditions to use marijuana.

 

Vermont

In 2004, Governor James Douglas allowed the "Act Relating to Marijuana Use by Persons with Severe Illness," passed by the Vermont General Assembly, to pass into law unsigned on May 26, 2004 to register patients, caregivers, and the creation and operation of four dispensaries in Vermont that provide marijuana for symptom relief to registered patients.

 

Washington

In 1998, voters approved Ballot Initiative I-692 to remove state penalties for qualifying patients with terminal or debilitating illnesses who, in the judgment of their physicians, may benefit from the medical use of marijuana.

 

West Virginia

In 2017, Governor Jim Justice signed into law Senate Bill 386 that created the Medical Cannabis Act that allows for cannabis to be used for certified medical use by a West Virginia resident with a serious medical condition.